A proposal to link minimum wage increases to the rate of inflation is being lauded by some and panned by others.

A bill is before the Legislature that would see annual minimum wage increases that match the consumer price index as measured by Statistics Canada.

Chair of Make Poverty History Manitoba Josh Brandon says he would be fine with such a move, if the minimum wage is brought up to $15/hour first.

He says minimum wage in Manitoba right now is a poverty wage, and tying it to inflation would entrench it as such. He says at Make Poverty History, they’re suggesting linking minimum wage to the poverty line.

“Once we get minimum wage up to a level that’s adequate for providing for families, then (it can) go up every year after that. But to start at such a low base would just keep families in poverty,” says Brandon.

Saskatchewan leads Canada’s provinces on The Conference Board of Canada’s first provincial food report card assessing the performance of their food systems and food sectors. Canada’s Food Report Card: Provincial Performance presents data and analysis on five categories: industry prosperity, healthy food and diets, food safety, household food security, and environmental sustainability.

Saskatchewan excels with “A” grades in four of five categories: food safety, industry prosperity, household food security, and environmental sustainability. Its only “B” grade is awarded on the healthy food and diets category. British Columbia is also among the top performers. It leads all provinces on healthy food and diets, and environmental sustainability, earning “A” marks on the two categories. Quebec, Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario are middle-of-the-pack performers, while Atlantic provinces trail with the lowest grades.

Quebec gets an “A” and leads all Canadian provinces on household food security, according to The Conference Board of Canada’s first provincial food report card. Canada’s Food Report Card: Provincial Performance presents data and analysis on five categories: industry prosperity, healthy food and diets, food safety, household food security, and environmental sustainability.

“Overall, Quebec is a middle-of-the-pack performer on the food report card, but the province is a standout performer on food security,” said Jean-Charles Le Vallée, Associate Director, Centre for Food, The Conference Board of Canada. “Food in the province is highly affordable and readily accessible.”

More than half of Canadians approve of Ontario’s basic income pilot project, but a sizeable chunk of those supporters don’t think it goes far enough.

The project will see as many as 4,000 people with low incomes in Hamilton, Thunder Bay and Lindsay receive up to $16,989 per year from the province, or $24,027 for a couple, with no strings attached, to see whether an increase in financial security bolsters job prospects and quality of life.

The poll, conducted by Campaign Research, surveyed 1,969 people and found that 53 per cent of respondents across the country supported the plan. Approval was highest among millennials aged 18 to 24 (59 per cent), Atlantic Canadians (63 per cent), and supporters of the federal NDP (63 per cent) and Liberals (62 per cent).

When Linda Bernard broke her ankle at work, she got a plant and a card from co-workers, but nothing from her employer.

Ten years at a non-profit daycare in Scarborough had earned Bernard no benefits, and she found herself paying for a cast, crutches and a walking boot before trying, unsuccessfully, to return to work.

When she caught ringworm and pink eye from the children, her employer, who offered Bernard no paid sick days, also refused to pay for medications. “Out of pocket you would have to buy the drops for your eye or the cream for your arm,” Bernard said Tuesday.